#119 A Conservative Cure for Climate Change: Bob Inglis

 

 

Climate scientists warn that Hurricanes Irma and Harvey are examples of extreme weather that will become much more common in the years to come. 

But Trump Administration officials ridicule any link between this month's devastating storms and global warming.

 

 

 

Without a change of heart, most conservatives will continue to resist an overwhelming body of scientific evidence on climate change. Congress will fail to pass needed reforms.

Enter former GOP Congressman Bob Inglis. He argues that while Republicans are part of the problem, they must be part of any solution. This small-government Christian conservative from South Carolina believes in a free-market answer to climate change. He supports a revenue-neutral carbon tax, combined with a cut in FICA - the fee paid by workers to pay for Social Security and Medicare.

"Until we hear the information from somebody we care about, it's hard for us to change our minds," says Inglis, who argues that respect rather than ridicule is the best way to win new converts. "If you get into the discussion and past the shouting we can find solutions," he tells "How Do We Fix It?"
 

#118 After Harvey: Climate Change Insurance. Gernot Wagner

Is climate change to blame for Hurricane Harvey and the devastating floods around Houston? Even though we can't be certain about the cause of a single storm, Harvey's epic rainfall and surprisingly long duration remind us of the need for urgent action.

In this edition of our solutions podcast, economist Gernot Wagner, executive director of Harvard University's Solar Geoengineeering Research Program, makes the case for market-based climate insurance: A fix that even skeptical conservatives could love.

If there was a 10% chance of a tree falling on your house, you'd buy home insurance. Gernot says that's what the U.S. and every other nation must do to reduce global warming. His fix for the planet? Carbon pricing through a program of cap-and-trade that lets the market find the cheapest way to cut greenhouse gas emissions. 

Companies that exceed their emissions cap pay a penalty. Energy-efficient firms make money by selling their pollution allowances. Cap-and-trade can boost growth and jobs. California has designed its own system to reduce pollution as it makes a transition to a clean energy economy

The weather is already changing. The daily surface temperature of the Gulf of Mexico this year is the warmest on record.  When the sea warms, more water evaporates into the air, leading to greater rainfall. 

How do we help the victims of the Houston flood? This link has some smart suggestions.